A Coptic Orthodox Christian cries for her relatives who were victims of Saturday's bomb attacks outside a Coptic Orthodox church, during a prayer ceremony at a home in Alexandria January 3, 2011. REUTERS/Asmaa WaguihAlmost a year ago, I blogged about how word of religious violence that happens in Egypt is suppressed by local and national authorities. It’s not openly discussed, and few would admit when it occurs, even when they know about it. For some reason, that one post generates the second-largest number of hits on my blog (with the top hit-generator being the one on how dismally poor Sylvia Browne’s prognostications are).

Obviously this trend has changed, with the New Year’s Day bombing of a Coptic church in Alexandria. That event generated a great deal of worldwide media attention; e.g. this Reuters story (cached here); the Egyptian government could not successfully suppress reporting or discussion of it.

It’s also equally obvious that, in light of the uprising that began this past January 25, the decades-old Hosni Mubarak regime is changing. Al Jazeera has been reporting on the uprising since it started and continues to provide the latest word on events there.

At any rate, we’re now watching history unfolding in a land where a great deal of it has already unfolded and which is ancient beyond compare.

Update: At long last, after a couple of weeks of defying protestors, Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak has resigned, leaving the country in the hands of the military (cached). What Egypt’s future will be without him at its helm, is anyone’s guess … but for now, the protestors have proven victorious. Here’s some video of the triumph, courtesy of Al Jazeera:

Photo credit: Reuters/Asmaa Waguih.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,