Veracicat has checked your facts and is not impressed with your lies.I’ve already blogged a number of times about the lies being told about the so-called “Mayan apocalypse” that supposedly will happen when the Mayan calendar ends on December 21, 2012. The hoopla about it continues, in spite of the fact that the Mayan calendar is not “ending” at all! Rather, the “long count” calendar is merely turning a page; the 13th baktun will end and the 14th will begin. There are also no “planetary alignments” or “rogue planets” which will destroy the Earth.

It’s not going to happen. And I repeat: It. Is. Not. Going. To. Happen. Period.

The good folks at NASA have been trying to debunk all the lies, but to little effect. As Scientific American reports, they just released a video which they think will help (WebCite cached article):

Scientists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory have put out a new video to address false claims about the “Mayan apocalypse,” a non-event that some people believe will bring the world to an end on Dec. 21.

In the video, which was posted online Wednesday (Mar. 7), Don Yeomans, head of the Near-Earth Objects Program Office at NASA/JPL, explains away many of the most frequently cited doomsday scenarios. [See video]

Addressing the belief that the calendar used by the ancient Mayan civilization comes to a sudden end in December 2012, and that this will coincide with a cataclysmic, world-ending event, Yeomans said: “Their calendar does not end on December 21, 2012; it’s just the end of the cycle and the beginning of a new one. It’s just like on December 31, our calendar comes to an end, but a new calendar begins on January 1.”

In case you’re curious, here’s the video in question:

As it turns out, this is not the first video NASA has released along these lines. Here’s one they did a while ago:

I have no doubt that neither of these videos will accomplish anything. All the “true believers” in the “Maya 2012 apocalypse” are going to continue to believe in it, regardless of anything NASA says about it … and in fact a lot of them will believe in it even more fiercely than they did before (due to the backfire effect, which coincidentally also figured into my previous blog post). They’re just too irrational — and too childish — to face the fact that their belief in the “Mayan doomsday” is a lie.

Update: Unfortunately I was right when I said NASA’s effort would be fruitless. The agency has had to continue its debunking efforts in the face of all the “Maya doomsday” lies.

Photo credit: PsiCop, based on original from quitor.com.

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