Posts Tagged “militant religionist”

Hypocrites Are Us (aka Hypocrites R Us)Stop me if you’ve heard this one. A sanctimoniously angry religionist who rails and fumes against the perceived “perversions” of others (e.g. gays), and who condemns the prevailing licentiousness of society generally, turns out to be just a tad less than the morally-unassailable, pure-as-the-driven-snow icon of ethical perfection s/he claims to be. Yeah, it’s not a new story. Like me, you’ve heard it a million times already. Jimmy Swaggart, George Alan Rekers, Jim Bakker, Marcus Lamb, Ted Haggard, are just a few of the many names that leap to mind in this regard. Well, today the Washington Post reported that Alabama’s most famous and most militant Christofascist might also be a pedophile (Archive.Is cached article):

Leigh Corfman says she was 14 years old when an older man approached her outside a courtroom in Etowah County, Ala. She was sitting on a wooden bench with her mother, they both recall, when the man introduced himself as Roy Moore.

It was early 1979 and Moore — now the Republican nominee in Alabama for a U.S. Senate seat — was a 32-year-old assistant district attorney. He struck up a conversation, Corfman and her mother say, and offered to watch the girl while her mother went inside for a child custody hearing.…

Alone with Corfman, Moore chatted with her and asked for her phone number, she says. Days later, she says, he picked her up around the corner from her house in Gadsden, drove her about 30 minutes to his home in the woods, told her how pretty she was and kissed her. On a second visit, she says, he took off her shirt and pants and removed his clothes. He touched her over her bra and underpants, she says, and guided her hand to touch him over his underwear.…

Aside from Corfman, three other women interviewed by The Washington Post in recent weeks say Moore pursued them when they were between the ages of 16 and 18 and he was in his early 30s, episodes they say they found flattering at the time, but troubling as they got older. None of the three women say that Moore forced them into any sort of relationship or sexual contact.

As if to fend off the inevitable Right-wing cry of “Fake news! Fake news!”, WaPo explains the ways in which they attempted to verify Corfman’s story. For instance, they checked court records to find that Corfman’s mother did, in fact, have a hearing at the time described. The paper also explains that neither she, nor the other three women mentioned, came forward with allegations against Moore on their own; they only coughed up their stories after multiple interviews. So none of them was motivated to “bring down” Moore.

Moore, of course, denies all of this and decried WaPo‘s story as fiction intended to destroy him. (Yeah, it’s that old Right-wing “Fake news!” mantra, coupled with the old standby “Left-wing bias” complaint. Yawn.) Still, that they checked out many details and have confirmed what they were able to, suggests this is anything but fiction.

Moore is, as one expects of furious Christofascists, angry and is resisting quitting Alabama’s Senate race. He has a lot of support in Alabamastan, even among folks who haven’t denied the encounters described might have taken place. For instance, state auditor Jim Ziegler has pointed out that Jesus’ mother Mary was a teenager when she was married (cached). They’re quite happy with their perpetually-outraged, militant Christianist “Ten Commandments” judge, and have no problem with him being — maybe! — a pedophile. All they care about is, once he’s in Washington, he can help force the entire country to worship the Ten Commandments right along with him.

That Moore would decry the sexual perversions of others, but engage in some of his own, makes him a brazen hypocrite. And hypocrisy, he may be interested to know, was explicitly and unambiguously forbidden him by the founder of his religion. But I guess Moore and his fanbois think it’s OK for him to disobey Jesus. After all, they’re doing it in his name. Right?

Photo credit: PsiCop original graphic.

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‘Terrorism is still terrorism … even if your God does it!’ / PsiCop original graphicGiven the wave of similar stories I’ve blogged about the last couple weeks, I just created a static page dedicated to the topic I call “disaster theology” (and the closely-related “massacre theology”). This is when some sanctimoniously-outraged religionist declares that some catastrophe was caused — or permitted to happen — by their all-powerful deity, who’s pissed off about something.

In the US, this is a common refrain among Christianists and the Religious Right. Just recently, for example, they told us that Hurricanes Harvey and Irma were caused by the expansion of gay rights in the US. Previously, all sorts of terrible events — the earthquake in Haiti, massacres in Newtown, CT and in Aurora, CO, and much more — have been attributed to God being outraged over something.

The unstated assumption behind all this, as I’ve remarked, is that the Almighty inflicts destruction and death wantonly on people (the innocent and guilty alike) in order to get them to do what s/he/it wants (or, perhaps more importantly, whatever the religionist promoting this notion wants). In other words, it assumes God is an almighty cosmic terrorist … no different, really, from all sorts of other terrorists we’ve heard about over the last couple decades.

I find it difficult to believe that any rational person would want to venerate and worship a being they obviously believe to be this horrific and malevolent. It defies reason to wish to do so. Only irrational people could actually support such a being — angry, nasty people who have no morals to speak of. It’s disturbing to live in a country where this sort of malevolent-deity worshipper is this common. In fact, it’s downright scary.

P.S. Given what his/her/its followers commonly believe about him/her/it, it’s not really all that difficult to conclude that the Abrahamic God is actually a malevolent being.

Photo credit: PsiCop original graphic.

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